Flower Photos

laurag

New member
Pro Member
Scarlet runner bean flowers from my vegetable garden this summer. These beautiful red flowers are prolific and very beneficial for visiting pollinators and hummingbirds.

Canon T6i
55-250 Lens
F 5.6
1/200 Second
ISO 100

red-runner-beans.jpg
 
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JGaulard

Member
Staff member
Pro Member
I took these images in 2012, right after I purchased my first DSLR camera. It was a Canon T3i, which was awesome and is still in use. The girl I sold it to loves it, which is just so cool.

Anyway, I was trying my hand at some macro photography. I attached a few magnifying filters to the lens and added some light.

These first two photos are the flowers of a crabapple tree in the spring.

If you'll take a look at the camera specs below, you'll notice that I was quite a beginner. Today, I would never let the ISO get up so high. There's grain in these images. I'd most likely slow down the shutter speed to compensate.

Camera: Canon Rebel T3i
Lens: Sigma 18-135mm @ 135mm
Aperture: F/5.6
Shutter Speed: 1/200 s
ISO: 1250

crabapple-flower-bud.jpg

Camera: Canon Rebel T3i
Lens: Sigma 18-135mm @ 135mm
Aperture: F/5.6
Shutter Speed: 1/200 s
ISO: 1000

macro-crabapple-flower.jpg

Camera: Canon Rebel T3i
Lens: Sigma 18-135mm @ 135mm
Aperture: F/5.6
Shutter Speed: 1/250 s
ISO: 100

flower-bud.jpg

Let me know what you think.
 

JGaulard

Member
Staff member
Pro Member
And here are a few more. These are still macro shots with my Canon kit 18-135mm lens. As you can see, the magnifying filters create an extremely shallow depth of field. I'm wondering how I would deal with that today.

Camera: Canon Rebel T3i
Lens: Sigma 18-135mm @ 135mm
Aperture: F/5.6
Shutter Speed: 1/200 s
ISO: 2500

leaves.jpg

Camera: Canon Rebel T3i
Lens: Sigma 18-135mm @ 135mm
Aperture: F/5.6
Shutter Speed: 1/60 s
ISO: 400

buds.jpg

Camera: Canon Rebel T3i
Lens: Sigma 18-135mm @ 38mm
Aperture: F/4.5
Shutter Speed: 1/50 s
ISO: 500

purple-flower.jpg

Camera: Canon Rebel T3i
Lens: Sigma 18-135mm @ 135mm
Aperture: F/5.6
Shutter Speed: 1/200 s
ISO: 1600

water-beads-iris-petal.jpg

Camera: Canon Rebel T3i
Lens: Sigma 18-135mm @ 45mm
Aperture: F/5
Shutter Speed: 1/60 s
ISO: 400

purple-iris.jpg

Camera: Canon Rebel T3i
Lens: Sigma 18-135mm @ 120mm
Aperture: F/5.6
Shutter Speed: 1/160 s
ISO: 1000

closed-iris-flower-bud.jpg
 

Herb

New member
I took these images in 2012, right after I purchased my first DSLR camera. It was a Canon T3i, which was awesome and is still in use. The girl I sold it to loves it, which is just so cool.

Anyway, I was trying my hand at some macro photography. I attached a few magnifying filters to the lens and added some light.

These first two photos are the flowers of a crabapple tree in the spring.

If you'll take a look at the camera specs below, you'll notice that I was quite a beginner. Today, I would never let the ISO get up so high. There's grain in these images. I'd most likely slow down the shutter speed to compensate.

Camera: Canon Rebel T3i
Lens: Sigma 18-135mm @ 135mm
Aperture: F/5.6
Shutter Speed: 1/200 s
ISO: 1250

View attachment 67

Camera: Canon Rebel T3i
Lens: Sigma 18-135mm @ 135mm
Aperture: F/5.6
Shutter Speed: 1/200 s
ISO: 1000

View attachment 68

Camera: Canon Rebel T3i
Lens: Sigma 18-135mm @ 135mm
Aperture: F/5.6
Shutter Speed: 1/250 s
ISO: 100

View attachment 69

Let me know what you think.
I never used macro-filters because I was told that shooting through more glass might be a problem. I bought extension tubes which I do use on occasion. I'll use them with either my Macro lens, or my 18-250. I started doing stack focussing with a bit of success. The first time I tried it I was shocked because 1- I was able to do it, and 2- I was pleasantly surprised that it worked. Now that spring is upon us, I'll have to re read your post on focussing rails and learn how to use the one I have.
 
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JGaulard

Member
Staff member
Pro Member
I never used macro-filters because I was told that shooting through more glass might be a problem. I bought extension tubes which I do use on occasion.
Yes, macro filters can either be useless or quite handy, depending on your needs. They narrow down the depth of field so much that you may not get the shot you want. I have to tell you though, for the low cost, they can get you right up and personal with some very small subjects. I can remember testing out one of my macro filter while trying to photograph an ant. It worked well. Also, you can stack them for even more magnification. I also heard that they can offer pretty cool effects when used with wide angle lenses, but I have yet to purchase any to fit mine.
 
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